Garden planting rotation chart



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Crop rotation is extremely beneficial for not only your crops, but also to aid in building and maintaining healthy soil, to minimise pests and diseases, reduce chemical use, and manage nutrient requirements — all which will maximise your harvest. The ideologies of crop rotation have been successfully used for thousands of years in farming and are still used today. The simplicity of crop rotation allows the practice to be used in your own vegetable gardens with great success. Crop rotation is self-explanatory — simply rotating your crops, so that no garden bed or plot grows the same crop in consecutive seasons.

Content:
  • Planning a Garden
  • 099-Understanding Crop Rotation: The Basics and Beyond, with Jack Algiere
  • Crop Rotation for Home Vegetable Gardeners
  • The Vegie Guide: Crop Rotation
  • How to practise crop rotation with veg
  • Plan now for crop rotation in your vegetable garden
  • How to Use Crop Rotation With Raised Beds
  • A vegetable garden planner for a healthy and productive garden
  • Crop Rotation – The Four Year Crop Rotation Plan
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: How to use crop rotation

Planning a Garden

Redawna Kalynchuk. Each month Redawna Kalynchuk draws on her extensive gardening experience to guide you through Growing Your Own Food in Canada: planning, planting, maintaining, harvesting and putting your garden to bed for winter. This week, Redawna shares the benefits of crop rotation and provides a guide to implementing this practice. You can start here! We know there are garden practices for a lush garden such as composting and mulching that in turn increase the harvest and health of the soil.

Another of those practices is crop rotation. In a vegetable garden, crop rotation involves changing the planting location of vegetables within the garden each season. This practice improves soil quality, reduces issues with soil-borne diseases and helps manage pests. We can take advantage of plant placement to add back to the soil with an easy system of rotating where we place plants from year to year. This is where having a garden master plan is handy and essential in the planning of vegetable gardens.

I like to make quick diagrams of my garden yearly so I can see the progression of the rotation from year to year. The easiest way to plan your rotation is to group plants that belong to the same family into four groups. The first is legumes , which includes peas, lima beans, beans and edamame.

The second grouping is root , and it includes onions, turnips, carrots, garlic, beets and radishes. The third group is leaf , which contains lettuce, greens like kale and spinach, herbs, cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower.

The final grouping is fruits , including cucumbers, tomatoes, squash, eggplant, peppers, melons and potatoes. The four families for vegetable crop rotation groupings are: Legumes : peas, beans, lima beans, edamame Root : beets, turnips, carrots, radishes, onions, garlic, celery Leaf : lettuce, greens, spinach, kale, herbs, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower Fruit : cucumbers, tomatoes, squash, eggplant, peppers, melons, potatoes.

Vegetable insect pests feed on similar plants and members of the same plant family. An example is an insect pest that attacks and eats cabbage, and lays its eggs before it dies. If a member of the cabbage family is planted in the same spot the next year, the eggs of the insect will hatch and the babies will find the exact food they need to continue their life cycle.

Soil borne diseases also can be hosted by specific plants. Removing host plants or alternating unrelated plants into the garden can break the cycle of pests and disease.

It is suggested you create a four-year rotation plan to break the cycle of soil-borne diseases. The top row is year one. The second row is year two and shows where each group is planted in the second year.

Row three again is year three and shows where each group is planted in the third year. The fourth row illustrates where each group is planted in its fourth year. At year five you begin the rotation again.

Redawna is the writer, photographer and content creator at Nutmeg Disrupted. She has over 20 years of gardening experience and has gardened from indoors under high-powered lights to frosty zone 2b gardens in northern Alberta. She enjoys pushing the boundaries of traditional gardening and loves empowering others to grow their own food.

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099-Understanding Crop Rotation: The Basics and Beyond, with Jack Algiere

Redawna Kalynchuk. Each month Redawna Kalynchuk draws on her extensive gardening experience to guide you through Growing Your Own Food in Canada: planning, planting, maintaining, harvesting and putting your garden to bed for winter. This week, Redawna shares the benefits of crop rotation and provides a guide to implementing this practice. You can start here! We know there are garden practices for a lush garden such as composting and mulching that in turn increase the harvest and health of the soil. Another of those practices is crop rotation.

If you plant the same crops (or crop families) in the same place in your garden, year after year. Then you will deplete the soil of some.

Crop Rotation for Home Vegetable Gardeners

What is crop rotation? In a home vegetable garden, crop rotation involves changing the planting location of vegetables within the garden each season. Crop rotation is used to reduce damage from insect pests, to limit the development of vegetable diseases, and to manage soil fertility. Why is crop rotation important? Each vegetable can be classified into a particular plant family. Plants belonging to the same family oftentimes are susceptible to similar insect pests and diseases, and have similar nutrient requirements. Over time, insect pest and pathogen numbers build in the area and damage to vegetable crops increases. Using crop rotation helps keep insect pest and pathogen numbers at low levels. In addition, the type of vegetable grown in a particular area in a garden has a direct effect on the fertility of the soil in that area. Each vegetable is unique in the type and amount of nutrients it extracts from the soil.

The Vegie Guide: Crop Rotation

For many of you who live further north, the summer growing season is just hitting its prime. But down here in central Texas, our gardens are winding down; my tomato plants have shriveled up in the heat and the cucumber plant is long gone. Does it matter what you plant where? In fact, it makes a big difference!

Crop rotation is the practice of changing what you plant where from one year to the next, based on plant groups. Rotating crops is important for vegetable gardeners, but it can be tricky in a small space.

How to practise crop rotation with veg

Family Food Garden may collect a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page. Sometimes not all your crops will do well in a season due to human error, weather or lack of soil amendments, which then opens the window for pests and disease. If this is your first garden you can get away with not worrying too much about crop rotation. Different crops need more or less NPK depending on whether or not they are a fruiting crop or leafy crop. Some crops are soil boosters and make fantastic pre crops before the nutrient hungry crops.

Plan now for crop rotation in your vegetable garden

Crop rotation is the practice of alternating crops of specific vegetable families to different areas of the garden from year to year. This gives the soil a rest from each vegetable family before that family returns to the same garden space again. Crop rotation ideally has a 3 year cycle, but if a small garden has you thinking a 3 year rotation is not for you, you can still plant different families in different places each year, or grow mixed plantings in your whole garden. Rotation is more important to some plant families than others. The most important ones to move are: brassicas, cucurbits, and solanums, in that order.

Learn why crop rotation is so important, and how to create your vegetable garden planner using the chart of garden crops and their plant.

How to Use Crop Rotation With Raised Beds

Crop rotation is a practice designed to minimise pests and diseases, reduce chemical use, aid in building and maintaining healthy soil, and manage nutrient requirements - all which will maximise yield. The principles of crop rotation have been successfully used for thousands of years in agriculture and are still used today. The simplicity of crop rotation allows the practice to be used in your own home with great success.

A vegetable garden planner for a healthy and productive garden

RELATED VIDEO: Crop Rotation in the Vegetable Garden - January 2014

One of the biggest obstacles for gardeners is crop rotation. This sounds like a simple task, but when you take into account which plants are companion plants, what type of soil each needs, and try to work those into crop rotation, well it gets a little confusing. Crop rotation is necessary whether you plant in a traditional garden or plant in raised beds. The bottom line is that soil needs to rest between different types of plants, no matter where they are rooted.

One of the wonderful benefits of living in Florida is that it allows for year-round gardening!

Crop Rotation – The Four Year Crop Rotation Plan

If you are growing an organic garden, prevention of diseases and pests is so important. We have several preventative tools to use. In last weeks post, I talked about the importance of cover crops in the home garden. The next step in maintaining a healthy garden is crop rotation. Crop Rotation means moving different crops around the garden in set time intervals. A common practice is to rotate crops yearly.

For me, a detailed vegetable garden planner is essential to growing a productive and healthy vegetable garden. It keeps me on track of when to sow seeds indoors, helps make crop rotation simple, and allows me to maximum production with a succession planting schedule. When planning a new vegetable garden, start off right by picking a site that offers plenty of light. Most vegetables need at least eight hours of full sunlight to support healthy growth and maximize production.



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